2.14.2017

Kelso's Choice Giveaway

Happy Random Acts of Kindness Week and Valentine's Day.
How are you celebrating?
I'm still on a natural high from Counseling Week;
here's a sample of the heartfelt notes I got from my superheroes.


I love that he feels like the special one,
I'm happy that he finds my puppets joyful,
and I'm touched that he aspires to be like me when he grows up!

I also got this cool Kindness Box!


The adorable little hand-drawn pick-me-ups tucked neatly inside the box, just waiting to warm up whoever picks one, are evidence that it only takes one, one little person, one little act of kindness, one little ripple ... 


... to make a world of difference.

And if all of that kindness weren't enough, our friends from Kelso's Choice have offered to partner with me to give away this AmAzInG conflict-resolution kit to one of my dedicated readers.
Isn't that so incredibly generous and kind?

We love Kelso's Choice because it not only teaches our students to discern between small problems and big problems, but it also empowers them with skills to solve their small, pesky annoyances while giving them permission to seek help with larger, more threatening issues.

If you're in the US or Canada and would like a chance to win this kit, comment between now and this Saturday, February 18th, at noon {CST} with an effective problem-solving strategy that you use at home, at school or in the workplace. 

A random number generator will choose one lucky winner; we'll post that name this weekend with directions on how to claim your prize. 

Good luck and thanks again for coming by the Corner.

This giveaway is now closed; congrats to Katie (comment #11) for winning the kit.









86 comments:

  1. Listen!! ๐Ÿ˜Š Also...breaking a problem into smaller parts.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hello! I teach students to use I-messages to work out problems with friends! Would love to have this amazing resource!❤

    ReplyDelete
  3. Perspective taking. Looking at the situation through the lense of another person.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I use big vs little deal language to help students learn what really matters.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Identify the problem, consider options to resolve, and validate feelings.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I love helping students compare the size of the problem with the size of their reaction!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I love to remind children that they choose how their respond. I have a fun activity where they try on different colored sunglasses to demonstrate different attitudes to various situations. The kids love it and it shows how much our attitude can impact our response to a problem!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I also teach using active listening and I messages.

    ReplyDelete
  9. First year counselor! I am working with my kiddos to check in with themselves and stop, think (about their options, if they're making a good choice) and then make the choice.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I practice breathing techniques with kids! I saw one student at a restaurant in town and she started showing me what she remembered! :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. The first component to conflict resolution is to LISTEN! How can we work out our problems if we aren't listening to what others are saying so that we can understand their point of view?

    ReplyDelete
  12. I work with my students in helping them to understand that can choose how they respond and to take responsibilities for their actions

    ReplyDelete
  13. My k-2 students have a few minutes during each lesson to check in with me about how they used Kelso's Choice at home with sibs or friends or on the playground or in the lunch room. We practice not using "names" while sharing stories.
    \

    ReplyDelete
  14. I am a school counselor and have classroom guidance for upper elementary learners. One strategy that we talk about is making a compromise with others. Often learners forget that they can solve these small problems on their own and compromising can help the friendship and make everyone happy.

    ReplyDelete
  15. i use the problem solving remote. i take a remote control put when trying to mediate a problem between students. i basically use the tool to help teach students when to just stop talking (i mute them) and just listen to hear others perspectives. plus, it helps lighten the mood when i keep muting different students and they start to interrupt the student speaking and I tap on it to make sure the batteries are still working etc. because clearly they wouldnt be talking while muted!

    ReplyDelete
  16. I am all about giving kids choices ! I have used kelsos wheel before ( from Pinterest) but I do not have the program ! I teach them to take deep breaths , count to five, and think about the choices they can make in the situation.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I work at an elementary school serving pre-k to 5th grade. Would love to have a resource like Kelso's Choice! Good luck, everyone!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Empathy- understanding how someone else feels and/or I messages.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Thank you so much for the chance!! We use mediation and listen to all sides of the problem, practice active listening, repeating what we hear from each other.... We discuss self control, honesty and honoring what each other is saying. We then work to accomplish a compromise and agree on a plan to move forward. Thank you as this resource is so necessary in our schools and I would love to be able to use this!! xo

    ReplyDelete
  20. An effective problem solving idea for K-2 is the Talk-Listen-Respond strategy. This has kids each take a turn sharing their concern, listening to the other persons concern, and responding to clarify. I act as moderator & like that it teaches them how to communicate...

    ReplyDelete
  21. Thanks for this opportunity. I use a bug and a wish as one strategy with younger kids

    ReplyDelete
  22. I encourage students to state what makes them unhappy using iMessage. Then offer a suggestion for resolution. Students are asked to make three attempts to resolve issues, unless someone is getting hurt. I will love to have this resource to better our skills.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Just used his wheel of choice to make conflict resolution frogs with some second graders! Would love to have the whole kit! Thanks so much Barbara and good luck everyone!!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Would love this resource. I use listen and compromise.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I teach I statements using a peace poster for students to work through small problems on their own

    ReplyDelete
  26. I've been wanting to add Kelso to our curriculum for a while. Being the only counselor in a school of 900 I think it's so important to teach problem solving skills.

    ReplyDelete
  27. I Messages are my go-to. Especially when students have tried asking someone to stop and they've seems little success. We talk about how I Messages share feelings and specifics that may change the reaction of the listener. Winning this would be A-MAZ-ING.

    ReplyDelete
  28. When teaching problem solving, we discuss how it takes both listening and talking. I love using I-messages and especially being empathy into the picture. This would be a great resource to integrate into my program! Thank you for the opportunity!

    ReplyDelete
  29. Talk it out! I stress the importance of the right time and place, use of I-messages, and willingness to listen and make eye contact! ~lilredcounselor

    ReplyDelete
  30. I would love to win this! I have heard wonderful things. I teach I statements and perpspective taking.

    ReplyDelete
  31. I teach them how to use I statements and we talk about taking a break and thinking about what we want to say before we say it.

    ReplyDelete
  32. I-Messages and small vs. big problems! Thanks for giving school counselors the opportunity to win awesome stuff! I've been using Kelso for years!

    ReplyDelete
  33. I teach kids to go through a peace path that includes using iMessages and lots of listening to one another.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Talking it out working on understanding each other's perspective & working together to find the best for both.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Empowering for all ages and a great tool school-wide.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Teaching perspective taking at a very early age is one conflict resolution lesson I do.

    ReplyDelete
  37. I always remind them to stop & breath. Then think about their choices, will their choice make the situation better or worse. Then remind them to make the choice that will make things better.

    ReplyDelete
  38. I would love to win this! Pick me. I would love to use this resource with my students! A problem solving strategie I use with my students is "I" messages.

    ReplyDelete
  39. Love Kelso's choices and would love this resource! We have a Kelso wheel painted on the playground for kids to use at recess!

    ReplyDelete
  40. I teach kids to take a breath and then ask questions to be sure they understand what the other person is saying (and that the other person is aware of how they are coming across).

    ReplyDelete
  41. Teaching de-bugging to problem solve. We do this by stating an I message. I feel... when you ... and assertively stating you don't like what is happening.

    ReplyDelete
  42. I teach my kids to identify the problem and determine if it's a big deal or little deal!

    ReplyDelete
  43. Empathy and I messages! Empathy to feel how the other person must be feeling and I messages that avoid blame- "I feel sad when you..." not "YOU make me so mad..." :) thanks for this opportunity!!!

    ReplyDelete
  44. Keep an open mind, loving heart.

    ReplyDelete
  45. We talk about a rock or dough problem. We discuss the problem & can you manipulate or change it. By helping them understand that we can only control how we feel about the problem and that is always the one part of the problem we can manipulate.

    ReplyDelete
  46. I like to teach students to talk it out and make a deal tonsolve their problems.

    ReplyDelete
  47. I messages and apologies. Teaching kiddos how to express their feelings and how to apologize by acknowledging the person's feelings and stating how they will make things better.

    ReplyDelete
  48. I teach students to use their "big voice" to teach others how to treat them.

    ReplyDelete
  49. I encourage kids to think of someone they respect who usually makes good choices and treats people with kindness (their choice - often they choose a grandmother) and think about how that person would respond in a given situation.

    ReplyDelete
  50. I use I messages and help students try to understand each others perspectives.

    ReplyDelete
  51. I created a peer mediation program - I train students to understand emotions, reactions, and problem solving techniques (such as listening, I statements, brainstorming solutions). Then when an issue arises between two students, the peer mediators work with them under my guidance in my office.

    ReplyDelete
  52. I love teaching empathy and perspective taking to my K-8 students. They are much kinder to each other, even when in conflict, because of it. Thank you for this opportunity!! As a first year counselor, I could really use this.

    ReplyDelete
  53. First year counselor here. I have been working with students to stop and think about the situation. Ask questions if needed. Use I messages about how you feel.

    ReplyDelete
  54. I-statements and understanding the situation from the other perspective.

    ReplyDelete
  55. We use the zones of regulation to stay calm when solving a problem.

    ReplyDelete
  56. We use lots of i messages and 4'part apologies when necessary.

    ReplyDelete
  57. I also encourage I statements and using a respectful assertive voice. Thank you for offering this. I work in Dk-2 and have 3 small children at home.

    ReplyDelete
  58. I use stop think choose stop light. I teach the students that they need to stop and think about the consequences first and if their behavior will get them in trouble they need to choose not to do it. Vise versa if their behavior will help them, choose to do it. It's a great tool to use for k-5

    ReplyDelete
  59. I teach active listening strategies and assertiveness.

    ReplyDelete
  60. I try to tell my students (and practice this at home) to take a break to calm down before trying to solve a problem. Nothing ever gets solved when people are upset.

    ReplyDelete
  61. Stop light method: Red=Stop and Listen, Yellow=Choose 2 ways to handle the problem, Green=use of those ways to fix it with an I message

    ReplyDelete
  62. We use "I" messages with our students at school. I feel___, when you___, I need____. It's a hard concept for some, but we need our kiddos to work on using their words and problem solving independently whenever possible!

    ReplyDelete
  63. We use: first, gaining composure by using the STAR breathing strategy (Smile, Take a Deep Breath, And Relax) from Conscious Discipline, then using I messages, and positive self talk.

    ReplyDelete
  64. Break it down into smaller problems and solve one problem at a time!

    ReplyDelete
  65. I am a first year counselor and at my school we have something called peer mediation, where a specific group of students are trained on how to help other students solve a small problem. Also love kelso's choice, this was used at a school I interned at.

    ReplyDelete
  66. I teach my students and own children to wait and cool off. It is so important to be ready to talk about problems before jumping into a conversation about the problem. We discuss how to calm ourselves down while we wait and cool off, and play calm down bingo.

    ReplyDelete
  67. Cool down with calm breathing prior to using I statements to talk it over.

    ReplyDelete
  68. Taking a break to breath, count, and reflect.

    ReplyDelete
  69. Oh this is AWESOME! Thank you for giving us the opportunity to enter this amazing contest! Yay! I hope I win (or rather my students win)!

    ReplyDelete
  70. Compromise! I always bring up using strategies like flipping a coin/rock, paper, scissors when it's a small problem to solve.

    ReplyDelete
  71. I always try to teach compromise, solving problems with a win-win mentality:)

    ReplyDelete
  72. I have been working with students on perspective taking and stopping the blame game.

    I also like working with students to show how our thoughts and feelings impact our choices/behaviors. We have a lot of control over both of those factors (like calming down our anger, working to use positive self talk, etc. before trying to solve the problem) and it helps to show how changing our thoughts or feelings can impact our outcome by role playing the different scenarios!

    ReplyDelete
  73. Mapping out the steps to solve a problem. Include the possible outcomes for each step and role playing once we decided the best choice.

    ReplyDelete
  74. Teaching students about filters. They can filter their thoughts and filter their choices.

    ReplyDelete
  75. I am an elementary school counselor and my favorite effective problem solving strategy is I-messages, particularly the one found in the Girls On The Run curriculum followed by roll playing!

    ReplyDelete
  76. Hi Barbara! Thanks for sharing how your little friends show their care for you...modeling is the best teacher and we know where they've learned it! We use Kelso's Choices here in Billings but unfortunately because it is so cost prohibitive we use it more piece-meal, having ordered this and that from the program and thankfully there are many resources online. It would be awesome to have an actual kit to use! Thanks again, friend for all you do!

    ReplyDelete
  77. We talk about (after cooling off if needed) to try and see the problem from the other person's perspective. Then we progress from there.

    ReplyDelete
  78. Twelve years ago I began my elementary counseling career in TX. My counseling partner was so excited and thrilled with Kelso's choices. Unfortunately, I didn't follow in her wonderful footsteps and use the program as expertly as she did. I know now how this program offers our students great problem solving skills that can benefit them through out their life time. Thank you for your willingness to share the wonderful curriculum with one lucky counselor!

    ReplyDelete
  79. We use the STEP method from second step: S-say the problem, T-think of solutions, E-explore consequences, P-pick the best solution!

    ReplyDelete
  80. I talk to my students on their level and in language they use. With title 1 kiddos this is magic. I also intervene research based atrategies.

    ReplyDelete
  81. Listen and think first and always remember if you can't say somthing nice, don't say nuffin at all (Thumper from Bambi)

    ReplyDelete
  82. I-messages and mirroring. I encourage students not just to listen to respond md but to listen to understand. "What I'm hearing you say is..." etc.

    ReplyDelete

I really enjoy hearing from my readers; thanks for sharing your reflections with us!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...