3.29.2013

PPBF: Wolf! Wolf!

If you've been looking for just the right story to help your students understand not only that they need to always tell the truth, but also what it means to create a win-win situation, then you must 
check out this PPBF!


Title:  Wolf! Wolf!
Written and Illustrated by: John Rocco
Publisher: Hyperion Books For Children New York
Date:  Fifth Edition February 20, 2007
Suitable for: Kindergarten - Grade 3 
Fiction
Simple Synopsis: This tale is an entertainingly whimsical spin-off of Aesop's Fable about the little boy who cried wolf. In this version, the aging, arthritic, and somewhat hearing-impaired Wolf hears the boy's call - "Wolf! Wolf!" - as he's tending his garden. He thinks he's being summoned by someone he might know, so off he goes to investigate. He sees that it's just a young boy playing a trick on some angry villagers. After three go-arounds, however, the crafty creature decides to trick the little prankster. 

Opening Page: 

THE HUNGRY OLD WOLF was too slow to snatch birds and too stiff to chase rabbits, so he tried growing food in a small garden.
     "Bah, weeds everywhere! There are so many I can't even find the vegetables." The old wolf growled, rubbing his empty stomach.
     As he yanked dandelions from where his carrots should have been, his ears began to twitch.

Resources:
Enjoy the Aesop's The Boy Who Cried Wolf {here}
Find curriculum integration from Round Rock ISD {here}
Read a review and suggestions on Margo Dill's blog {here}

Why I like this book: Readers of every age are likely to enjoy this humorous version of an age-old tale because it's hilarious; I like it, too, because it's full of follow-up food for thought. Compare and contrast it with Aesop's version or other versions on the market. How are the versions alike? How are they different? How do all of the versions connect to the virtue of trustworthiness? Is honesty always the best policy? Why or why not?

The idea of setting the story in Asia makes for an interesting twist. Students can now research whether or not drawings of the clothing, landscape, and the overall look of the story are accurate. What do students find as they study Eastern culture and philosophy that's comparable to their lives? What are some notable differences?


In Wolf! Wolf!, the author creates a win-win situation; use the story as an opportunity to talk about stakeholders in our choices and decisions. Every action creates a reaction. Ask your students to think of a time when their good choice created a win for themselves as well as for two other people in their lives. Have them create a win-win graphic organizer to show the concept visually.

With springtime just around the corner, this would also be a good opportunity to talk with students about gardening. The privilege of having a garden comes with it the responsibility of tending it. Watering and weeding are a big part of those duties. What would happen if you didn't weed your garden? What if you didn't water it? For enrichment and/or a service project, find a plot where your students can plant a giving garden. Plant veggies like radishes that are easy to grow. Donate the produce to a local homeless shelter.



23 comments:

  1. I really ike this twist on an old tale. Great story for kids. And, I love John Rocco.

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    1. Well, if you love John Rocco, then I do, too. You have piqued my interest in checking out more about him. Thanks for stopping by, Pat!

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  2. Ooo, John Rocco. Good choice. The message really comes across through the stellar use of humor.

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    1. You are so right, Joanne. This book is hilarious but still brings home the message. I appreciate you stopping by the Corner!

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  3. So many activities to try! Thanks, Barbara.

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    1. You are welcome. Thank you, Wendy, for coming by. I do have fun enriching a story to differentiate for my little learners.

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  4. Replies
    1. Yes, Julie - it is an extremely FUN twist on an age-old tale. Thanks for coming by!

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  5. I LOVE that win-win graphic organizer-really makes them think about the consequences of their actions!

    Shannon
    http://www.irunreadteach.wordpress.com

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    1. Awwww, thanks, Shannon! You always leave sunshine behind when you visit the Corner.

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  6. This looks and sounds like a really fun book! I'll have to check it out! Thanks for sharing!

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    1. I smile every time you come by, Rhythm. I have a feeling you're gonna LOVE this one!

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  7. That book looks great! I checked my library's online catalog and I don't have it so I'll be ordering it soon!
    Swersty’s Swap Shop

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    1. What an honor for a librarian to choose a book for her library because of my recommendation and review - thanks, Swertsy!!

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  8. What a cool retelling of the classic tale. I also like your chart to show the effects of one student's actions. Great pick!

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    1. Why thank you! It helps to show our students that their choices can have positive as well as negative consequences.

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  9. Thank you Barbara for sharing your thoughts and ideas on books. I love dropping by to see what you've been reading. Have a blessed weekend!

    imgoingfirst@gmail.com

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    1. I am happy to hear from you again; hope all's well in OK! I'm tickled that you want to see what I'm reading!

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  10. Loved this fun retell of an all time favourite. Great activity Ideas too. Thanks for sharing it with us, Barbara!

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    1. I predict that you will LOVE this version. Thanks for your kind words about my activity ideas and for stopping by the Corner!

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  11. Love the opening lines. This kind of book is right up my alley! Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Oh, Penny, I do agree that this one might be right up your alley. Do let me know what you think when you find yourself a copy!

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  12. Thanks Barbara, I love the whole "win-win" approach to looking at the story. Thanks for highlighting my book on your blog. Lisa M. from Disney pointed it out to me.
    Best,
    John

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I really enjoy hearing from my readers; thanks for sharing your reflections with us!

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